Nerd Nite SF #37: Cyber-Peace, Data Science, and Designing for Emotions!

Nerd Nite SF #37: Cyber-Peace, Data Science, and Designing for Emotions!SOLD OUT!
Instead, check out “Science, Neat” on 6/18 or our sister event in Oakland, “Nerd Nite East Bay”, on 6/24.

Wednesday, 6/19
Doors at 7 pm, show at 8
Rickshaw Stop, 155 Fell St @Van Ness
$8 (advance tix here - SOLD OUT)
All ages

Facebook event

“Nerd Nite SF: Making the Intangible Tangible Since 2010!” Or something like that. And this month in particular. But don’t be put off by the abstractnesses outlined in these talks’ abstracts. (Or by our beginning sentences with conjunctions.) Come, grasp a cold alcoholic beverage while grasping the seemingly ungraspable: Make code, not war! Mine, define, recombine data! Let your sweat, tears, and pounding pulse be your guides! Be there and be square!

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“Cyber-Peace? WTF Is That?” by Rick Wesson

After spending a few years fabricating digital warheads Rick Wesson is exploring the flip side of the torpedo: the concept of “peace” in cyberspace. What can cyber-peace be amid the escalating tensions in the virtual world? With the current threats to our privacy and the open commons being facilitated by the NSA, their for-profit contractors, and your favorite Silicon Valley “cyber-crime fighters,” it behooves us all to join a different kind of anti-war movement. Make code, not war!

Rick is CEO of network security company Support Intelligence and protagonist of Worm: The First Digital World War, among other impressive acronymic involvements (ICANN, DNSSEC). When not growing organic veggies, building shotspotters, herding sheep, and being a patriot, he enjoys coding out of a 40’ shipping container.

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“Demystifying Data Science” by Jessica Kirkpatrick

Data. There’s a heck of a lot of it floating around out there. But how do we discover it, rein it in, interpret it, and make it findable, understandable, and useful? Well, it helps to be a statistician, computer scientist, firefighter, treasure hunter and therapist rolled into one–or you could become what has been called the sexiest job of the 21st century: data scientist! So, what exactly is data science? How is all this data changing business? And how does one enter this hot new field?

Jessica is an astrophysicist-turned-data scientist. After receiving her PhD from UC Berkeley in 2012, she joined the data science team at the social network Yammer.

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“Sweat and Arousal: Measuring and Designing for Emotions” by Elliott Hedman

A kid jumping into a ball pit. A shopper navigating the supermarket. An audience experiencing the Blue Man Group. You grabbing a beer and watching this presentation. In all these activities, emotions physically change the body and mind. Why does this matter? How can we better design our world to respond to these fluctuating, subconscious physical responses? By the end of this talk, you will know how to have a better colonoscopy, why bridges are a great place to find a date, and how to build a better emotional experience.

Elliott arrives from the MIT Media Lab/IDEO where his PhD focuses on making emotions tangible by measuring subconscious, physical responses. He dreams of a day when milk will be placed at the front of the store.

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DJ Alpha Bravo mans the decks, spinning vinyl and tweeting along to the presentations’ themes. Find out what you’re listening to by following @djalphabravo.

Upstairs food by the legendary Grilled Cheez Guy!

Nerd Nite SF #36: Reversing Heart Disease, Human Limitation, and Video Game Design!

Reversing Heart Disease, Human Limitation, and Video Game Design!Wednesday, 5/15
Doors at 7 pm, show at 8
Rickshaw Stop, 155 Fell St @Van Ness
$8 (advance tix available here)
All ages

SOLD OUT!

No tickets at the door. Hope to see you at next month’s Nerd Nite SF or at Nerd Nite East Bay on 5/27!

Facebook event

We’re a fragile species, what with our heart disease and video game addictions and, well, fragile-ness. But fear not: Nerds are here to help you make sense of it all, with alcoholic drinks and righteous tunes lubricating the way. So, come, turn on the right genes, understand your bodies’ limits, and get the straight dope on what it’s like to design video games. Be there and be square!

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“Backmasking 3 Billion Beats: How to Reverse a Heart Attack in Your Skinny Genes” by Kim Cordes Metzler

The heart beats more than 3 billion times during a lifetime, but for an estimated 25% of us, heart disease can cut those beats short. Scientists and doctors are trying to reverse the mechanisms of disease so we can get some of those beats back. This talk will provide a glimpse of how cutting-edge research is allowing us to turn on 3 genes, our “skinny genes,” to backmask, as it were, the music of our hearts.

Kim earned her Ph.D. in genetics and development at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical School at Dallas in 2009. After completing her postdoc at UCSF and the Gladstone Institute of Cardiovascular Disease, she continues as a staff scientist at Gladstone creating stem cells to study heart disease.

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“Future Perfect: The Limits of the Human Body” by Jacob Ward

Our frail vessels have an alarming tendency to burst, burn and break, and yet we constantly travel to dangerous places, dive under the ocean, fly, drive, drink alcohol, and otherwise do things that our bodies are wholly unqualified to handle. We’ll discuss the science of human limitation, and what fundamental technologies make it possible for us not to suffocate, freeze, catch on fire, or otherwise die the thousand deaths that our unbelievably dangerous lives whisk us past each day.

Jake is editor-in-chief of Popular Science, the world’s largest science and technology magazine. He’s written for The New Yorker and Wired, and has hosted television shows for Discovery, PBS and National Geographic. He splits his time between New York and California.

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“Lessons Learned as a Game Design Mercenary” by Brian Bartram

Necromorphs and Nazis! Stormtroopers and Scooby Doo! Transforming robots and simulated cities! DARPA and the Department of Homeland Security! What do these have in common? And why would any sane person make a career out of designing video games? The journey is long and fraught with peril, so heed my tales if you’ve ever wondered what it’s like to work in the trenches of video game development.

Brian is a video game designer who has seen tours of duty on games such as SimCity, Dead Space 2, Star Wars: The Old Republic, and The Saboteur. He has worked on simulation games, third-person action games, open-world games, MMORPGs, and first-person shooters for PC, consoles, and portable game systems.

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DJ Alpha Bravo mans the decks, spinning vinyl and tweeting along to the presentations’ themes. Find out what you’re listening to by following @djalphabravo.

Nerd Nite SF #35: Paper Airplanes, Zombies, and Space Hacking!

The Brainy Dead courtesy of Rob Sacchetto — zombieportraits.com

The Brainy Dead courtesy of Rob Sacchetto — zombieportraits.com

Wednesday, 4/17
Doors at 7 pm, show at 8
Rickshaw Stop, 155 Fell St @Van Ness
$8
All ages

Advance tix
Facebook event

Sorry to break it to you, but it seems the zombie apocalypse is kinda inevitable, so we’ll be learning about that. (Time to have a drink or three!) But before we all become the undead, won’t it be nice to learn how to make a few killer paper airplanes? Or maybe escape our zombified fate entirely by hacking our way off this planet? Come celebrate the cruelest month with drinks, music, and, oh yeah, learnin’! Be there and be square!

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“Plane Crazy: The Unexpurgated Tale of the Record-Breaking Paper Airplane Guy” by John Collins

John Collins, a.k.a. The Paper Airplane Guy, smashed the Guinness world record for paper airplane distance in 2012. Along the way, NASA snubbed him, the previous world record holder tried to sabotage him, and people plied him with ideas both weird and wonderful. This paper-folding raconteur who has taught thousands of people to make paper airplanes will teach us, too. Wear your safety goggles if you don’t want the pointy end of a plane in yer eye!

John is the author of three published collections of paper airplanes: The Gliding Flight; Fantastic Flight; and The New World Champion Paper Airplane Book, published last month, which chronicles the record chase, the breakthrough plane, and 20 more great designs.

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“They Will Kill You, Eat You, and Turn You: Zombies, the Next Great Thing in Research!” by Joseph Chen

Stem cell research is cool, but it will inevitably cause the Zombie Apocalypse. And what we’ll face won’t be the slow, decayed, shambling undead that are easy to dismember. Instead, we’ll get the fast, angry, genetically modified zombies without inhibitions or memories. They will want to eat your brains. They will kill you. They will infect you.

Joseph is a postdoc at UCSF, working primarily on HIV, and also a part of a team of researchers developing adult stem cells for therapeutic purposes. Previously, he worked for Merck and Schering Plough, where he developed treatment strategies for Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s.

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“The Hacker’s Guide to the Galaxy” by Ariel Waldman

Don’t panic: The next big science revolution isn’t just for asteroid miners. Just as science fiction has often shown the way to future inventions, hacking is now generating prototypes that will act as footholds for future explorations, discoveries, and epiphanies in science. Find out how you can actively explore the final frontier by getting excited and making things.

Ariel Waldman is the global instigator of Science Hack Day, a research affiliate at Institute for the Future, and the founder of Spacehack.org, a directory of ways to participate in space exploration. Recently Ariel was appointed as an NRC committee member of a congressional study on the future of human spaceflight.

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DJ Alpha Bravo mans the decks, spinning vinyl and tweeting along to the presentations’ themes. Find out what you’re listening to by following @djalphabravo.

Nerd Nite SF #34: DIY Drones, the Birds & the Bees, and Soundscapes!

Romalea guttata courtesy of Becky Jaffe

Romalea guttata courtesy of Becky Jaffe

SOLD OUT! This month’s event has completely sold out. There will not be tickets available at the door. Sorry!

It is a special Nerd Nite indeed that can guarantee to explore every definition of the word “drone!” From the pilotless aircrafts cooked up by amateur aerospace engineers, to the male bees and other creatures that engage in wacky sexcapades, to the humming of the universe itself, our speakers will promise not to drone on. So procure an alcoholic beverage and tune in to our nerdy frequency: Be there and be square!

Wednesday, 3/20
Doors at 7 pm, show at 8
Rickshaw Stop, 155 Fell St @Van Ness
$8
All ages

Advance tix - SOLD OUT
Facebook event info

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“DIY Drones” by Chris Anderson

What happens when you combine smartphone guts, open-source software, and toy planes and copters? Fully autonomous flying robots! Find out how a band of amateurs beat the aerospace industry to the future of aviation: small, cheap, and out of control.

Chris Anderson is the CEO of 3D Robotics and founder of DIY Drones, former editor-in-chief of Wired Magazine, and author of The Long Tail and Free, as well as the new Makers: The New Industrial Revolution.

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“Genital Plugs, Projectile Penises, and Gay Butterflies: A Naturalist Explains the Birds & the Bees” by Becky Jaffe

Birds do it, bees do it–even educated fleas do it. Let’s do it, let’s fall in lust as photographer and insect fetishist Becky Jaffe takes us on a romp through Mother Nature’s freaky side. Biophilia? This talk may well bring on a biorgasm!

A photographer, naturalist, and educator living in Oakland, Becky Jaffe (www.beckyjaffe.com) teaches high school biology and leads environmental science tours at UC Berkeley’s Botanical Garden.

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“Soundscapes” by Mark Rosin

We’ll explore acoustic life in sex, bass, and outer space, from bedroom antics to an audio tour of the Universe. It turns out space isn’t silent–if you know how to listen. Close your eyes and enjoy a slide show for your ears.

Mark Rosin is a UCLA physicist and member of Guerilla Science (http://guerillascience.co.uk/), who mix science with art, music, and play.

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DJ Alpha Bravo mans the decks, spinning vinyl and tweeting along to the presentations’ themes. Find out what you’re listening to by following @djalphabravo.

Nerd Nite SF #33: Physics Circus, Epigenetics, and Weird Fungi!

Nerd Nite SF #33: Physics Circus, Epigenetics, and Weird Fungi!Step right up to the most amazing (drunkest), most thrilling (nerdiest), most awe-inspiring (wear safety goggles) show on Earth–or at least in SF on the third Wednesday of the month! The coolest science teacher will play ringmaster to a physics circus, a biochemist will prove you don’t have to jump through flaming hoops to change your genetic makeup, and a mycologist will entertain you with the clowns of the mushroom world. Be there and be square!

Wednesday, 2/20
Doors at 7 pm, show at 8
Rickshaw Stop, 155 Fell St @Van Ness
$8
All ages

Advance tickets
Facebook event

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“The Perilous Abracadabra of Physics!” by Marc “Zeke” Kossover & his Physics Circus

Physics demonstrations are like perfect magic shows: They have all the spectacle, but there are no tricks. The amazing world we live in actually works that way! These are the experiments that your physics teacher didn’t do because they were too dangerous, crazy, or weird. Come for the liquid nitrogen-spewing, glass-breaking spectacle, but leave understanding the science!

Marc “Zeke” Kossover was an Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellow to the US government, where they listened to him from time to time. Along with performing at science events around the country, he is a mentor teacher with the Exploratorium and runs Sidewalk Science.

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“How Your Lifestyle Can Change Your Genes” by Rhonda Patrick

“It’s genetic–nothing I can do about it, right?” Wrong! If you have a family history of heart disease, diabetes, obesity, breast or prostate cancer, or Alzheimer’s disease, then you merely have a predisposition that can be prevented and even reversed. By changing your diet and lifestyle, you can reach into your DNA and turn genes on or off–and even pass these changes on to your offspring. Come learn the why and how of flipping your epigenetic switches!

Rhonda Patrick is passionate about disseminating health-related information to the public. Now a postdoc at the Bruce Ames (as in the Ames test!) Lab at CHORI, she earned a biochemistry degree from UCSD and a Ph.D. from the University of Tennessee Health Science Center.

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“The World’s Weirdest Fungi” by Paul Nagami

Join us as we root around and uncover the strangest, most unbelievable fungi on Earth, from the “Humongous Fungus” under Oregon (Armillaria solidipes) to the tiny Drewes’ Phallus (Phallus drewesii). Carnivorous fungi, brainwashed ants, and the Malaysian Spongebob fungus (Spongiforma squarepantsii) will also feature in this magnificent mycological expedition.

Paul Nagami has been hunting, identifying, and eating wild mushrooms since he was in fourth grade. He co-hosts the microscope table at the Mycological Society of San Francisco’s (www.MSSF.org) annual Fungus Fair.

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DJ Alpha Bravo mans the decks, spinning vinyl and tweeting along to the presentations’ themes. Find out what you’re listening to by following @djalphabravo.

Nerd Nite SF #32: Shibboleths, Dark Energy, and Crosswords!

First, the good news: We have a coupla language nerds and a cosmologist coming to help you fulfill your resolution to drink more and learn more! Start sharpening your shibboleths and prove you belong; contemplate the mysteries of dark energy; and be reminded why Eero Saarinen is every crossword lover’s favorite designer. Scientist-cum-food-carter Grilled Cheese Guy‘ll be here, too, to feed our maws!

Now the great news: Happy Nerd Year, for this is the year of the first annual Nerd Nite Global Festival! In NYC in mid-August (oh joy!), you can rub shoulders and get day-drunk with nerds from all over the world while guzzling greatest-hits presos and much more. Getcher tickets here. (And move fast, supply is very limited.)

Be there and there and be square!

Wednesday, 1/16
Doors at 7 pm, show at 8
Rickshaw Stop, 155 Fell St @Van Ness
$8 (advance tix available here)
All ages

FB event

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“Shibboleths, or How Not to Get Killed for Saying the Wrong Thing” by Luke Swartz

If you didn’t have any paperwork, how could you prove your nationality? Recite the state capitals? Spout arcane baseball rules? How about just talk? What do you call the highway between SF and LA: “5″ or “the 5?” (Or is it a “freeway?” And what do you call SF and LA, anyway?) We’ll examine the many ways we divide ourselves by how we talk, and why people have been literally killed for saying something the wrong way. Bonus: Learn how to tell whether an Italian restaurant is legit!

Luke “use the” Swartz was born and raised in the City (go SI Wildcats!) and studied symbolic systems (what’s that?) and computer science down on the Farm (Stanford). A lifelong language nerd, he drove nuclear submarines for 7 years and now works as a product manager for i18n (Internationalization) engineering at Google.

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“Dark Energy and the Fate of the Universe” by Debbie Bard

Ever gazed up into space and wondered what’s out there? Well, cosmologists do this for a living and there’s an easy answer: We don’t know. Sure, everyone has a theory. But 15 years ago we found out that some kind of mysterious dark energy makes up 70% of the universe, and we simply don’t know what it is. In this talk we’ll discuss the evidence for dark energy, what it might be, and how we can study it. We’ll also attempt to get our heads around what this means for the future of our universe!

Dr. Debbie Bard is a reformed particle physicist who now studies cosmology at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. She’s trying to figure out the structure of the universe and how this has evolved over time, and is therefore accustomed to feeling very, very insignificant.

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“Get Across and Get Down! The Art and Science of Crossword Puzzles” by Steve “Ringo” Riley

Like music and poetry, crosswords must work on both technical and aesthetic levels. This talk will explore all things black and white and square all over, from AALTO to ZZTOP. Learn about what makes a cunning clue, a pithy entry, and a shrewd theme–and more importantly, learn how to get a puzzle rejected because you decided to fill it with dick jokes. (ed: Please tell me this included a Will “Shorty” Shortz clue.)

Steve “Ringo” Riley obviously has too much time on his hands. Always looking for his next nerdy obsession, Ringo is an intellectual dilettante with a degree in mathematics and a background in computer science and psychology. His puzzles have been published in The New York Times and The Harvard Crimson.

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DJ Alpha Bravo mans the decks, spinning vinyl and tweeting along to the presentations’ themes. Find out what you’re listening to by following @djalphabravo.

Nerd Nite SF #31: Schizophrenia, Blood, and Sewers!

Wednesday, 12/19
Doors at 7 pm, show at 8
Rickshaw Stop, 155 Fell St @Van Ness
$8 (Advanced tickets)
All ages

Facebook event

UPDATE: John “The Paper Airplane Guy” Collins had to cancel (with a very good reason), but we’re looking forward to hosting him in the near future. The amazing Patrick House will be gracing our stage this month in John’s stead with a fascinating talk on the history of schizophrenia!

Grab yourself a stiff drink and get ready for a history of schizophrenia, examine the bleeding edge of universal blood research, and frolic in the sewers of San Francisco. Be there and be square!


“The Slow Death of the Muse: A History of Schizophrenia & Hearing Voices” by Patrick House

Did humans 10,000 years ago stub their toes? Did they break their arms? Of course. But did they have schizophrenia? That’s trickier. Are some mental illnesses a necessary disease of humanness, or exclusively a modern disease? How can we ever know? If schizophrenia is so debilitating, why is it still around? Why did James Joyce & Albert Einstein both have schizophrenic children? Why is the voice in a schizophrenic’s head always the voice of god or the devil, and not the postman?

Patrick is getting a Ph.D. in Neuroscience at Stanford University, looking at whether brain parasites in humans might be a factor in some cases of schizophrenia. But he has already peaked, having won The New Yorker’s Cartoon Caption Contest a few years ago. Since then he has had trouble living up to the expectation of being witty, which he is not.


“Breaking the Blood Bank: The Path Toward Universal Blood”
by Ahnika Kline

Sitting in the bloodmobile enjoying your post-donation cookie? About to have surgery and anxious that the docs have a little extra on hand? Hey–wouldn’t it be nice to know what’s in that blood stuff, anyway? We’ll see what happens to blood after donation, examine the different blood types, and consider the risks associated with receiving blood. And we’ll delve into the development of safer, universal, and synthetic blood (true Tru Blood for veggie vamps!).

In a world filled with Twilight movies the world has become blood-obsessed, and Ahnika is no different. She holds a PhD in cell biology and is expecting an MD in 2013. Her current research at UCSF focuses on blood vessels and the cells traveling within them.


“Combined Sewerage: Where the **** Hits the Fan”
by Karen Kubick

Every day in San Francisco, hundreds of thousands of toilets are a-flushing, showers a-flowing, and washing machines a-spinning. That’s a whole lotta water and a whole lotta flow, but where, oh where, does that water go? Beneath the streets lie miles of pipes, and above ground are pump stations, odor control, and other facilities. After learning about the marvels of the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission’s combined sewer system, you’ll really want to worship the porcelain god!

Karen is a registered Professional Mechanical Engineer in the state of California and heads up a multi-billion-dollar program to handle poop and rain.

DJ Alpha Bravo mans the decks, spinning vinyl and tweeting along to the presentations’ themes. Find out what you’re listening to by following @djalphabravo.

Nerd Nite SF #30: Lock Picking, Bioengineering, and Organ Transplants

Wednesday, 11/14
Doors at 7pm, show at 8
Rickshaw Stop, 155 Fell St @Van Ness
$8 (advance tix here!)
All ages

FB event page

We’re coming atcha a week earlier than usual to make sure you have lots of factoids for Thanksgiving table conversation fodder. You’re welcome! So come get your degree from the College of Lockpicking, grow a new liver with bioengineering or, if that doesn’t work, get one transplanted! Be there and be square!

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“Going Off-Key: An Introduction to Lock Picking” by Eric Michaud

You can pick your friends. You can pick your nose. But can you pick a lock? College of Lockpicking’s esteemed professor/founder leads us through Locksport 101: Discover the inner workings of locks from the 2nd century BCE to the present day; examine a modern pin-tumbler, and find out what makes picking them possible; and, finally, learn to pick a better lock! In the process, join CoL in publicly challenging the traditionally guild-protected secrecy of locksmithing, and open locks and minds in the service of ourselves and our communities.

This talk is the distillation of a touring workshop founded by Eric Michaud and Jamie Schwettmann inspired by a Nerd Nite Austin talk they gave. College of Lockpicking donates over 10% of the project’s gross revenues to hackerspaces, community workshops, and other educational charities.

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“Bioengineering: Building Humans Better or Building Better Humans?” by Kyle Kurpinski and Terry D. Johnson

If you’d like to perceive colors that other people can’t see while enjoying an effortlessly muscular physique covered by a robot exoskeleton that you control with your mind, we’ll talk about how to do that. After giving a brief overview of the history of human repair and enhancement, we’ll discuss where the current research is headed–and where it isn’t. And along the way, we’ll conduct a field test of our alcohol dehydrogenases, demonstrating our optimism for the future of liver tissue engineering.

Kyle holds a Ph.D. in bioengineering, having traded dreams of breakdancing and neurosurgery to move small amounts of liquid back and forth from adorable little tubes. He’s now the executive director for a Master’s program in bioengineering, consults, and is co-author, with Terry, of How to Defeat Your Own Clone (and other tips for surviving the biotech revolution).

Terry has a Master’s degree in chemical engineering from MIT and is currently teaching bioengineering at UC Berkeley. He hopes that by doing so, he will be giving students the tools that they will need to repair him when he gets older.

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“A Modern Day Frankenstein: A Look at the Magic and Strangeness of Organ Transplantation” by Leeza Pachepsky

The probability of me being alive right now is about 1 in 2.5 billion. Why? I almost died twice and survived two liver transplants. In this talk, I will lead you into the awe-inspiring, fascinating and disturbing world of organ transplantation. I will tell you how my life depended on a linear regression, describe how your liver runs your world, and show how Steve Jobs and I think alike. Am I still “me” with two other people’s DNA inside me? Would you still be you if most of your organs were replaced? I will describe advances in organ transplantation that will allow most organs be replaced and possibly enhanced in the not-so-far future. Would you want to replace your body organs, Neuromancer-style, if that was possible?

Leeza Pachepsky was a computational ecologist and created virtual ecosystems of plants and animals. Recently she became much more interested in human behavior. After a foray into the world of marketing analytics, she is on a sabbatical working on her own projects.

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DJ Alpha Bravo mans the decks, spinning vinyl and tweeting along to the presentations’ themes. Find out what you’re listening to by following @djalphabravo.

Nerd Nite SF #29: Explosives, Coral Reproduction, and Sideshow “Freaks”

Where else but NNSF do you get the sexiest, freakiest, most explosively drunken lectures around? We’ll have a chemist talking about blowing things up, a biologist who lives to help sea creatures get it on, and a physician/scientist taking us beyond the sideshow and deep into the science of the mutants of old-timey circuses. Be there and be square!

Wednesday, 10/17
Doors at 7pm, show at 8
Rickshaw Stop, 155 Fell St @Van Ness
$8 (advance tix available here)
All ages

FB event

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“Explosives: Why Things Go Boom!” by Zach Demko

Explosives are the most powerful chemical reactions possible. They are used for destruction and creation, propulsion, intimidation, and art. But what makes a good explosive? In this talk you will learn how terrorists blow up hummers, NASA gets astronauts into space, and the Nazis tried to make invincible flamethrowers–and what happens when the boom goes bust. Wear your nattiest Kevlar suits, everyone!

Zach managed to escape his childhood with all fingers intact and without burning down anything major, at least unintentionally. He got his Ph.D. in chemistry with a Nobel laureate. Over time, his focus has shifted to making drugs–but that’s another talk altogether. Now he works at a start-up that helps people make designer babies. Well, not quite. At least, not yet.

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“Coral Sex Therapy: Helping Coral Make Sweet, Sweet Love” by Richard Ross

Don’t get out much? Feeling like you may never meet that special someone to make babies with? Oh, and are you a tad endangered, too? Welcome to the sex life of a sessile animal. In August, biologists met in the Florida Keys to better understand how spawning is triggered, collect and fertilize gametes in the lab, and then use those juvenile corals to colonize public aquariums, as well as repopulate the area around the Keys with healthy, genetically diverse coral. In this talk we’ll discuss why the corals are endangered, advances in the practicality of their sexual reproduction, and how people are helping protect and repopulate the corals that have been disappearing.

Rich is a biologist at the California Academy of Sciences, where he cares for a variety of animals, including corals, octopuses, cuttles, vine snakes, archer fish, and even an albino alligator. At home he does the same thing, but for his fantastic wife, 9-year-old daughter, naked cats, and chickens.

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“Peerless Prodigies of Physical Phenomena: Circus Sideshow Acts and the Science Behind Them” by Anne Deucher

Come one, come all! Step right up and take a journey back in time to the circus sideshow of 1910! REVEL in the incredible, persevering, resourceful, and marvelous human beings behind this curtain! The Elephant Man! Lion-Faced Boy! Lobster Boy! The Human Unicorn! The Bearded Lady! Cyclops! General Tom Thumb! All the “freaks” are here! SEE their inspirational stories of triumph over nature, fate, and the judgment of man! LEARN how modern science explains their unique existences! NOT FOR THE FAINT OF HEART!

Anne is a physician/scientist at UCSF with specialty training in hematopathology and molecular genetic pathology. After countless years of failed explanations of her career to her mother, she has learned that the best way to describe what she does is to say, “like on CSI.”

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DJ Alpha Bravo mans the decks, spinning vinyl and tweeting along to the presentations’ themes. Find out what you’re listening to by following @djalphabravo.

11/1 – Nerd Nite at Sea!

Nerd Nite SF and the Aquarium of the Bay have teamed up to bring you an evening of science, drinks, and music on the Bay! It’s all part of the Bay Area Science Festival. Begin with a private event at the Aquarium of the Bay at Pier 39 where you can learn about the Bay ecology and see sharks, jellies, and all the other animals in their 700,000+ gallon aquarium. Then climb aboard the Hornblower hybrid-powered ferry at Pier 33 and cruise the Bay while having drinks, grooving to DJ Alpha Bravo, meeting scientists, and exploring hands-on activities. Be there and be square!

11/1: Aquarium of the Bay 6-7:30pm, Bay Cruise 7:45-10pm. $20. Ages 21+.

300 person capacity, so hurry and get your tickets at http://nerdniteatsea.eventbrite.com/

 

FAQs

 

Are there ID requirements or an age limit to enter the event?

Attendees must be 21+ and have ID.

 

What are my transport/parking options getting to the event?

MUNI: The ‘F’ line stops directly in front of Pier 39. The 47 and 8X lines stop very nearby as well.

Parking: Public parking facilities are available at Pier 35 or across from the main entrance at the PIER 39 garage. The garage is open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Please note that neither Aquarium of the Bay nor Hornblower Yachts validate parking, but many PIER 39 restaurants do.

 

Is food & drink included?

Drinks will be on sale at cash bars. Small bites of sustainable seafood from local restaurants will be featured at the Aquarium of the Bay. Other food options are readily available nearby.

 

Where can I contact the organizer with any questions?

Questions may be directed to s...@nerdnite.com

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